Netiquette Banner Netiquette, by Virginia Shea, page 107

Chapter 12
Netiquette at Home

When you enter cyberspace from home, you probably spend most of your time pursuing activities that are just for fun. As you start getting connected, you may find that you want to spend more and more time in cyberspace. You may find yourself spending less time with your family. If you're a teenager, both you and your family may consider this an advantage. But, in many cases, your family will decide it wants you back.

What to do about this? First of all, never let the computer replace human interaction. Sure, networks are a substitute for face-to-face conversation. We've used substitutes like that for a long time; that's why writing was invented. But even with letters, telephones, videoconferences, and email, we still fly across the country for a meeting occasionally. And you owe your family at least the same courtesy you give your colleagues.

Try to schedule your online time for when others in your family are doing something else. For example, if you live with a sports fan but you can't tell the Bills from the Cowboys, the Superbowl is a great opportunity for some heavy net interaction.

If you're a student, you can always claim to be doing your homework. If you live with your parents, chances are good they'll never figure out what you're up to. Roommates are more likely to catch on, especially if


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