Blake List — Volume 1998 : Issue 91

Today's Topics:
         Dickinsonian and Blakean Circumference
         Cable TV Descrambler ........ NOW ONLY   $7.00 !
         Re: Dickinsonian and Blakean Circumference
         ?Mrs Blake's Pregnancy
         Re: Dickinsonian and Blakean Circumference
         bat?
         Re: bat?
         Re: ?Mrs Blake's Pregnancy
         Re: Dickinsonian and Blakean Circumference

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Subject: Dickinsonian and Blakean Circumference
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 08:12:56 -0600
From: Franklin 
To: blake@albion.com

Dave & Bev Popely wrote: I haven't heard from any one  for the past 2/3
days. Is the line still working? Can we discuss other poets  as well as
Blake?

I'd love to discuss other poets.  In particular, I've been working with
Emily Dickinson's use of "circumference" lately and wonder if she read
Blake at any point in her life.  Seems highly unlikely but possible....

Bill Franklin

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Subject: Cable TV Descrambler ........ NOW ONLY $7.00 !
Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 01:38:58 EST
From: GIDGE1026@aol.com

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Subject: Re: Dickinsonian and Blakean Circumference
Date: Thu, 26 Nov 1998 13:36:10 +1100
From: hbri1@student.monash.edu.au
To: blake@albion.com

To Bill Franklin:

this message may not get through, as Seth said he will be pulling the
plug soon, and I've only just seen my E-mails. But to answer your
question about Emily Dickinson, no, there is absolutely no evidence
that she ever saw Blake's work, according to both her library
contents and her letters.

Yours,  Hassanah Briedis

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Subject: ?Mrs Blake's Pregnancy
Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 22:38:33 -0700
From: "S&J Faulkner" 
To: James Watt 
CC: blake@albion.com

  Dear Jim,
               The line has gone quiet apparently.
    But, yes, I am still here and your note prompted me to get the answer to
this query.

    Apparently the reference to Mrs Blake's pregnancey comes in a book by
A.S.Wyatt called Tower of Babel. Wyatt in this work of fiction (based
presumably on fact) says Blake was sexually frustrated because they were
told not to try to have children after the miscarriage or stillbirth.
    Like you, Ihad never heard of this in any history and it may all be
speculation but I thought it would be worth following up to see if there is
any truth to this.
    I doubt the veracity as Blake alluded to the times he was able to
worship at the shrine of his beloved wife  - this statement in the last few
days of his life.

    It still does interest me why they never  had children.

     I haven't read the book myself but if anyone can follow this up, please
let me know

            Best wishes,
                                Stephen



----------
>From: "James Watt" 
>To: S&J Faulkner 
>Subject: Re: A Question
>Date: Wed, Nov 25, 1998, 10:27 AM
>

>Hi Stephen.  I don't know you, but I hope you'll let me know what you
>found out about your question re: Mrs. B's possible pregnancy.  I have
>read pretty extensively in the biographical materials and I can't recall
>anything hinting in this direction, so I have my doubts.  In the first
>place, B. was hardly the type to employ anything like a physician (more on
>class grounds than on philosophical ones).  It is more likely that, if
>there was in fact a miscarriage, the source would be a midwife or, perhaps
>an herbalist or "cunning woman."
>
>Jim Watt
>Butler University
>Indianapolis, IN
>
>p.s.  I am busy teaching this semester and so I only have time to "scan"
>the list at odd moments, so I apologize if this is "old business."
>
>On Sun, 15 Nov 1998, S&J Faulkner wrote:
>
>> Dear Friends in Ulro,
>>                                 The ferocity of the accusations of some of
>> the members of this line lead me to the conclusion that the web is an
>> extension of Ulro. I naively believed that it could be perhaps threefold in
>> its vision but this is not the case.
>>
>>     However, no matter, because even the state of Ulro is important for
>> searching souls - I spent many years there myself rationalising all sorts of
>> behaviours and beliefs in the name of a mindless dispassionate science.
>>
>>     I have a question: Did Mrs Blake ever have a pregnancy which ended with
>> a miscarriage or was stillborn? Were they advised not to try to have
>> children again?
>>
>>     A friend  advised me of a recent book which claimed that this was the
>> case.
>>
>>           Yours in fourfold vision.
>>
>>                             Stephen
>>
>>
>>
>

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Subject: Re: Dickinsonian and Blakean Circumference
Date: Thu, 26 Nov 1998 11:01:11 -0600
From: Franklin 
To: blake@albion.com

hbri1@student.monash.edu.au wrote:
> ... to answer your question about Emily Dickinson, no, there is
absolutely no evidence that she ever saw Blake's work, according to both
her library contents and her letters.
>
> Yours,  Hassanah Briedis

I thought as much-- yet I find interesting resonances.

B Franklin

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Subject: bat?
Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 01:25:50 +0800
From: Ching 
To: blake@albion.com

hello all, someone commented over dinner tonight that blake has a poem
about bat/s...winking and blinking etc. personally i'm skeptical and
don't seem to be able to locate it in my copy of the poems. does anyone
have a clue about this, or any poem that might sound vaguely like it?

thanks
ching

 .`.,,.                              .,,.`.

The sound of one hand clapping is the sound of the wind.

`.,.,,.`..,,.`..,,.`.,.`..,,.`.,.

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Subject: Re: bat?
Date: Thu, 26 Nov 1998 12:06:46 -0800
From: "Adam C. Komisaruk" 
To: jackbing@pacific.net.sg, blake@albion.com

At 01:25 AM 11/27/98 +0800, Ching wrote:
>hello all, someone commented over dinner tonight that blake has a poem
>about bat/s...winking and blinking etc. personally i'm skeptical and
>don't seem to be able to locate it in my copy of the poems. does anyone
>have a clue about this, or any poem that might sound vaguely like it?
>
You're thinking of a little song from "An Island in the Moon," unengraved
manuscript from the 1780s:  It goes something like:

Lo the bat with leathern wing
Winking and blinking
Winking and blinking
Like Doctor Johnson

It's a parody of some poem, I forget which.  Joshua Reynolds' portrait of
Johnson was sometimes known as the "Winking Sam" because it alluded to its
subject's poor eyesight.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Adam Komisaruk
komisaru@ucla.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I mayhavebeen on-
                 ly three but
                               I
                                  was
                                         swingin'


                           Lambert/Hendricks/Ross
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

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Subject: Re: ?Mrs Blake's Pregnancy
Date: Thu, 26 Nov 1998 15:41:35 -0600
From: tomdill@wc.stephens.edu (TOM DILLINGHAM)
To: blake@albion.com

That's A.S. Byatt, not Wyatt, and the story has bee around much longer
than that, though it is indeed entirely speculative.
I believe several earlier critics speculated that the friction between
William and Catherine might have had to do with her failure to produce
a child--but I also believe the speculation was based on inferences from
the poetry, not from any documentary evidence.  I am sorry I don't have
time to track down the references at this time, but I will try later on.
If I am not mistaken, the comment occurs as early as Gilchrist's
biography, though it is oblique.
Tom Dillingham

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Subject: Re: Dickinsonian and Blakean Circumference
Date: Sat, 28 Nov 1998 22:39:48 -0900
From: ndeeter 
To: blake@albion.com

Franklin wrote:
>
> hbri1@student.monash.edu.au wrote:
> > ... to answer your question about Emily Dickinson, no, there is
> absolutely no evidence that she ever saw Blake's work, according to both
> her library contents and her letters.
> >
> > Yours,  Hassanah Briedis
>
> I thought as much-- yet I find interesting resonances.
>
> B Franklin

Of course there's a resonance--they both composed in common measure. The
question is: What connects them? How does a recluse and a
bordering-on-mad genius come together to find a single form?

Sorry, Seth.

I'll shut up now.

Nathan Deeter
ndeeter@concentric.net